Is Dating Safe During The Coronavirus Outbreak? Here’s How To Do It

In an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are encouraging people to practice “social distancing,” a term that refers to making a conscious effort to reduce close contact with others. If that phrase makes you feel 10 times lonelier, you aren’t the only one. But for the sake of keeping yourself and those in your community healthy, it’s best to avoid non-essential hangouts and hookups. It’s possible to date safely during the coronavirus outbreak, but it requires a little creativity and flexibility… not to mention WiFi.

The CDC’s most recent guidelines at the time of publication note that the virus spreads primarily through contact between people who are within six feet of each other and is carried via respiratory droplets (from coughing and sneezing, for example). The CDC recommends canceling or postponing gatherings of 50 or more people, and several city and state governments have mandated the cease of large-scale events, as well as the temporary closure of restaurants and bars. Additionally, Belgian economist Andreas Backhaus analyzed data comparing COVID-19 cases in Italy and South Korea and found that young people (ages 20 – 29) are often asymptomatic carriers — meaning they feel healthy, but can still pass the virus to other people.

That’s why many immunologists and officials recommend avoiding non-essential contact with others. “The need to practice social distancing is something we all should do to reduce the spread,” Vincent Racaniello, Ph.D, a Columbia professor of microbiology and immunology, tells Elite Daily. “Most people will only have mild disease, but the concern is that older people, or those with health problems, will have serious disease requir[ing] hospitalization. We do not want to overburden hospitals, because if they are, they won’t be able to provide proper care.”

It may not be worth putting yourself and others at risk in order to meet new people right now, but if you’re DTF (and here, that means down to flirt), you have options.

“Humans are social creatures and during this period of physical isolation, people are looking for alternative ways to socialize,” says Lyndsey Wheeler, co-founder of Here/Now, a dating company that organizes singles’ mixers. “Dating shouldn’t have to stop just because we can’t go out to bars or restaurants.”

Here’s how to keep your love life fun while practicing social distancing.

Make The Most Of Dating Apps

Kaitlyn McQuin@kaitlynmcquin

You know who’s really gonna suffer during this social distancing?

Dudes on dating apps

Welcome back to courtship, Brad. Welcome back to talking to a gal for WEEKS prior to meeting.

We’re pen pals now, my dude.

We bout to get Jane Austen up in here.

Now, write me a poem.

77.5K people are talking about this

Let’s be real, a good chunk of your love life has probably always revolved around the internet. So this should come as second nature to you: It’s 100% safe to swipe for hours and flirt endlessly with cute strangers from the safety and comfort of your own couch. In these strange times, nothing is hotter than a person who can woo you with words. Don’t be afraid to make the first move and send over a swoon-worthy compliment. Get creative and fire off cheeky banter. Ask thought-provoking questions to keep the conversation flowing.

Flirt Over Video Chat

Sweet quotes for V-day Instagram captions.
Shutterstock

Rather than meeting up for a date, consider a FaceTime date instead. “It’s one way to stay connected to real people without having to meet in the physical world,” a rep for Bumble previously told Elite Daily. Rather than struggling to hear your date over a crowded bar and doing the awkward wallet dance at the end of the night, you each bring your own beverages or snacks to your computer or phone and get to know each other online.

If you’re a college student, you can sign up for Love Over Zoom, the brainchild of two Yale computer science majors that uses an algorithm to match up students around the country for Zoom dates. Ileana Valdez, one of the co-founders, previously told Elite Daily, “Because we were going to be isolated, it was OK to ‘shoot your shot’ and be brave about dating.”

If you’re in New York or Los Angeles, Here/Now is offering virtual mixers of 10 people at a time on the evenings of March 17, 18, and 19. “We’ll curate the group, invite everyone to set the vibe in their own living rooms (for example, light a candle and pour themselves a drink), have a host present to guide the experience, and put people into a series of short one-on-one conversations to get to know each other better,” Wheeler explains. “Afterwards, we’ll help connect anyone who felt a mutual spark so they can keep up the virtual hangs until we’re able to meet IRL once again.”

While it might feel weird at first to conduct your entire dating life from the safety of your own home, the very first eHarmony and Tinder users probably felt the same way back in the day — and now, dating sites and apps have transformed dating for good. Love Is Blind recently demonstrated just how powerful conversation can be. By the time the threat of this outbreak passes, you might have already met the Cameron to your Lauren. Stay safe, friends.

If you think you’re showing symptoms of coronavirus, which include fever, shortness of breath, and cough, call your doctor before going to get tested. If you’re anxious about the virus’s spread in your community, visit the CDC for up-to-date information and resources, or seek out mental health support.

 

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Tales of Rock – Fountains Of Wayne’s Adam Schlesinger Dies At 52 After Contracting COVID-19

“Oh god, no…”

Adam Schlesinger, one of the most prolific and decorated songwriters of his generation, died Wednesday from complications caused by COVID-19. He was 52.

His death was confirmed to NPR by his lawyer, Josh Grier.

With former songwriting partner Chris Collingwood, Schlesinger enjoyed his greatest commercial success as a musician with Fountains of Wayne, which released five studio albums between 1996 and 2011. In 2003, “Stacy’s Mom” was a hit for the band; that song later helped Fountains of Wayne land a pair of Grammy nominations. But Schlesinger also kept busy outside Fountains of Wayne, even during its commercial peak: He played in Ivy (whose six albums came out more or less concurrently with Fountains’ output), Tinted Windows (a short-lived power-pop project with Taylor Hanson of Hanson, Bun E. Carlos of Cheap Trick and James Iha of The Smashing Pumpkins) and the synth-pop group Fever High. He also produced albums for many other artists.

Schlesinger’s career extended well beyond his work in bands. He had a hand in many of the songs that populated the critically beloved TV series Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, and he won three Emmys — one for Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and two, both with David Javerbaum, for co-writing songs performed in Tony Awards telecasts. With Javerbaum, Schlesinger was nominated for two Tonys (both for 2008’s Cry-Baby) and won a Grammy for A Colbert Christmas: The Greatest Gift of All!.

A versatile songwriter with a gift for straddling genres and musical eras, Schlesinger wrote frequently for film, with credits ranging from three songs in the romantic comedy Music and Lyrics to the Oscar-nominated title track to Tom Hanks’ 1996 film That Thing You Do!.

Tributes began appearing on Twitter as news of Schlesinger’s death circulated. Javerbaum described Schlesinger as “a brilliant songwriter, musician, collaborator and friend,” adding, “You enriched millions of lives with your boundless creativity, none more than mine.”

David Javerbaum

@davidjaverbaum

Adam, you were a brilliant songwriter, musician, collaborator and friend.

Gorgeous melodies spun out of you like silk through a loom.

You enriched millions of lives with your boundless creativity, none more than mine.

Thank you Adam.

I love you.https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/01/arts/music/adam-schlesinger-dead-coronavirus.html 

Adam Schlesinger performing in 2010 in Manhattan.

Adam Schlesinger, Songwriter for Rock, Film and the Stage, Dies at 52

He made suburban characters shine in Fountains of Wayne songs and brought pop-rock perfection to the Tom Hanks film “That Thing You Do!”

nytimes.com

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Gay Dating Apps Warn Over Coronavirus As Online Meetings Expected To Rise

Some sites, including Hornet, are urging users to maintain a “remote” social network.

Leading LGBT+ dating websites are warning users to take precautions to avoid contracting coronavirus but are expecting an uptick in traffic as millions of people move online to talk rather than meet face-to-face in bars and clubs.

 

Many, including Hornet, which has more than 25 million regular users, have recently added advisory notes on how to avoid contracting the virus which has infected more than 130,000 people globally and caused almost 5,000 deaths.

 

More than 100 LGBT+ rights groups this week called on U.S.public health officials to address the heightened vulnerability of gay and trans people, warning that their frequently weakened immune systems can put them at greater risk.

 

“We’ve shared a variety of news articles over the past few days inside the app in addition to sending messaging,” Sean Howell, co-founder of Hornet, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by email on Thursday.

 

Part of Hornet’s advice is maintain a social network “but remotely.”

“Social contact helps us stay mentally healthy and fights boredom,” its note stated.

Scruff, which has more than 15 million members worldwide, said it had started to send out coronavirus tips from the World Health Organization (WHO) “in chunks of 100,000 until all users are alerted,” which should be completed by Friday.

 

A spokesman for Grindr, the world’s best-known gay dating app which has more than 4.5 million daily active users and was sold for $608.5 million earlier this month, declined to comment.

Her and Fem, both aimed at women, did not respond to requests for comment.

Last week, Tinder, which has nearly 6 million subscribers, added an advisory note that users see when swiping between prospective partners to warn over coronavirus, which has been declared a pandemic by the WHO.

 

“Tinder is a great place to meet new people,” the note said.“While we want you to continue to have fun, protecting yourself from the coronavirus is more important.”

Dating apps, however, might prove to be a lifeline for the LGBT+ community as the coronavirus crisis deepens with the number of people moving online rising, operators said, although adding that exact numbers were as yet unavailable.

 

“I suspect we will see increases in traffic just like we doin the winter months,” said Howell.

 

“Social and dating apps are often about meeting people (but)they’re also about having community and maintaining it online when we can’t do it in person.”

 

Carl Sandler, chief executive and founder of Daddyhunt, which with company stablemate MR X has 4.4 million global users, said this was a time when dating apps came to the fore.

 

“Dating apps have a role to play even as people limit the numbers of (real life) contacts they have,” he said.

 

 

Quarantine and chill: How New Yorkers are Mating and Dating during Coronavirus

In fair Corona, where we lay our scene, Juliet is prepping for a hot pandemic lockdown.

“Condoms, a bunch of sex toys . . . also, a mask — but not for coronavirus purposes,” says Mal, 41, reading off her quarantine shopping list.

The Lower East Sider, who declined to share her last name for privacy reasons, tells The Post that she has great sexpectations for the guy she’s been seeing during this viral outbreak. She thinks the next few weeks will be like those after the 9/11 attacks, when she and her then-boyfriend holed up in an apartment for several steamy days.

“We were stuck inside . . . and it was fantastic,” she says. “I felt safer with him.”

Coronavirus panic may be driving locals indoors, but it’s not killing their mojos. It just means they have to get craftier about canoodling — whether they’re single or partnered. That means setting up dates in less-crowded places (to gel with recommendations from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention), swapping face-to-face liaisons for sexy texts and cuffing a crush for a potentially lengthy quarantine.

Jason Lynn, 24, is trying to lock down his corona cling — fast.

“I’m working the DMs,” says the single financial adviser, who lives in North Jersey. “It’s been quiet . . . Everyone’s very cautious.”

But if his company tells him to work from home, he hopes to shack up with someone specific: a Connecticut girl he’s been seeing. Ideally, “in her place,” far away from the germy city.

“It would be heaven to be stuck with her for two weeks,” says Lynn, who’s been stocking up on protection of all kinds: disinfectant wipes, hand sanitizer and condoms. He’s envisioning Netflix and chill sessions — a “Narcos” binge watch with plenty of nooky interludes.

“I’d get to really know her,” he says.

Meanwhile, New Yorkers with long-distance lovers are trying to figure out how to connect.

Things are extra complicated for Westchester County resident Isabel Baer and her boyfriend Adam Konig, who works for Microsoft in Seattle, since both live in COVID-19 hotspots.

Enlarge ImageIsabel Baer and Adam Konig.
Isabel Baer and Adam Konig.Isabel Baer

“I was supposed to go visit him, but then we both got freaked out,” says Baer, 21, a former political campaign staffer. She and Konig, 23, have been together for a year and a half, and long-distance for eight months. “If domestic flights get cancelled for months, I’d be really upset.”

For now, they’re rerouting. This weekend, the two plan to spend their monthly visit in Konig’s hometown of Dallas.

“He’s nervous that I’m going to bring coronavirus to Dallas and be patient zero in Texas, but I don’t have symptoms and I’m not sick,” says Baer, who says they’ve been keeping the love alive through FaceTime. “I don’t want to get hysterical.”

Enlarge ImageIsabel Baer and Adam Konig.
Isabel Baer and Adam Konig.Isabel Baer

In the local swingers scene, people are mourning the unsexy side effects of crowd control.

“Play parties hosted at private venues or houses that me and my partners frequently visit have been empty the past two weeks,” says Tim, a technology firm executive who declined to share his last name for privacy reasons.

The 33-year-old from Hoboken, NJ, gets the reasoning — “I wouldn’t want to get anyone sick” — but says it’s “frustrating,” and says his dating life has been “significantly” impacted by the outbreak.

While some sex parties in the city are reportedly staying open — and incorporating “extra soap and sanitizer” into their gatherings — organizers of the regular “orgies” and “fetish parties” Tim attends have told him that “they might be cancelling the upcoming two months in advance,” he says. “They [don’t] want to continue until the whole scare dies down.”

Like Baer and Konig, Tim has a tech-centric backup plan for the worst-case scenario.

“I would look into video sessions with cam girls,” he says.

Going digital has emotional perks, too.

“There’s a sense that you’ve been speaking to someone longer, so you could invite them over because you kind of already know them,” says Mal.

As for married couples? Things are less lusty in that corner. The virus is causing friction between partners — and not the fun kind.

“I wanted to prepare as early as possible just to make sure we were covered, and my husband wasn’t being helpful,” Vanessa, a 30-year-old mom from Harlem, tells The Post. “He still gets annoyed at me when I tell him to wash his hands properly.”

But optimists like Mal hope that lovers will use the opportunity to reignite their relationships. In her case, she’s excited to take things to the next level with her hopeful corona cling. Although they’ve been on a few dates, they aren’t official, she says — but all the craziness has inspired her to have The Talk with him.

“We’re going to have that discussion soon,” she says, “because I’ll want to be quarantined at my place.”

 

 

Liz – Chapter 2 – Okay, I’m Going to Do This

Charles, I need to reschedule. My co worker took her life last night. I thought I’d be better by now, but it’s still pretty hard.

“OMG that’s awful. I’m so sorry.

Days later….

What are you doing today after 5?”

“Yeah, it’s still shocking. I feel awful. After 5? I’m not sure yet. Can I let you know as it get closer? How is Sunday for you? I’m free between 1 and 4. We can just meet up.”

“I’m busy between 11 and 4 today. ” (Fucking Megasun) What about Monday or Tuesday?”

“Maybe Monday.”

“What time works for you on Monday?”

“How about 5pm at Marathon Grill?”

“Ok. 5pm today at Marathon 16th and Sansom.”

“Great see you then.”

“Excellent.”

Hours later….

“Still good to meet at 5pm?”

“Yes see you then.”

 

So it’s on with Liz. Let’s see what happens….

 

 

Phicklephilly: Special Report – What You Need To Know About Coronavirus

Special thank to my friends over at the Washington Post!

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2020/02/28/what-you-need-know-about-coronavirus/?arc404=true

 

Latest Updates

  • The government announced 1.9 million high-speed coronavirus tests would start to be available this week in hardest hit states. Priority of testing would go to health care workers, first responders and people over 65 exhibiting cough, fever or other respiratory symptoms.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Sunday that for the next eight weeks there be no mass gatherings of more than 50 people to combat the spread of coronavirus. The guidelines define mass gatherings as “conferences, festivals, parades, concerts, sporting events, weddings.”
  • The U.S. Senate is expected to vote early this week on a bill passed by the House of Representatives Saturday to provide help to workers affected by the coronavirus outbreak, as well as to provide free testing and increase funding to programs that help feed older adults.
  • In an attempt to protect the U.S. economy from the impact of the coronavirus outbreak, the Federal Reserve Sunday dropped interest rates to 0 percent.
  • President Donald Trump has declared the coronavirus a national emergency. The designation frees up to $50 billion in funding that state and local governments can use to fight the spread of the disease.

 


What can older adults do to reduce their risk of illness?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued new guidance for older adults and people who have chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and lung disease. This population is at increased risk for serious illness from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. Here’s what the agency recommends:

Avoid crowds, rethink daily activities  

Many states, cities and communities have taken social distancing guidance from the CDC seriously and closed schools, set limits on the number of people who may gather in one place and asked businesses to send employees home to telework.

Churches, restaurants, bars, gyms, movie theaters and more also have made decisions to close to keep crowds from spreading COVID-19.

The CDC also has advised that nursing homes and long-term care facilities ban outside visitors, guidance that comes as a long-term care facility in Washington battles a COVID-19 outbreak that has resulted in multiple deaths.

Starting at age 60, there’s an increased risk of death from the coronavirus, “and the risk increases with age,” Nancy Messonnier, an internist and director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. said in AARP’s recent Coronavirus Information Tele-Town Hall.

The highest risk of severe illness from the coronavirus is in people 80 and older, “and especially in people who are older and have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes and lung disease,” Messonnier added.

Avoiding sick people and washing your hands often are two preventive strategies public health experts have been pushing to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

Stock up on supplies

Older Americans and adults who take routine medications should make sure they have “adequate supplies” on hand – enough medication to last two weeks to a month, said Messonnier.

It’s also important to stock up on over-the-counter medications to treat fever, cough and other symptoms, as well as tissues and other common medical supplies.

Major health insurers have pledged to relax prescription refill limits on “maintenance medications” in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. Prescription refill limits are also being waived for Medicare Advantage and Part D beneficiaries.

If you run into difficulty stocking up on your prescriptions at the pharmacy, consider refilling your medications with a mail-order service, the CDC says. You can also ask your physician to switch your prescription from a 30-day supply to a 90-day supply to make sure you have enough medication to get through a potential COVID-19 outbreak in your community.

And make sure you have enough food in the house in case you have to stay home for an extended period of time.

“I think we’re now talking about people having a two-week supply,” said Irwin Redlener, a pediatrician and director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, referencing the quarantine timelines health officials have so far implemented for the coronavirus.

What’s the best way to protect myself?

Limit exposure. That’s the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This means avoiding destinations that have reported spread of the virus, and thinking twice “before you expose yourself to someone who is showing symptoms,” Messonnier said.

Health officials also advise taking everyday steps that can prevent the spread of respiratory viruses. Wash your hands often with soap and water (scrub for at least 20 seconds), and use alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap is not an option. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands, and cover your coughs and sneezes.

Some other advice: Stay home when you are sick, avoid crowds if you are at increased risk for the illness, and clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces. 

“This is the other side of not spreading the disease, which is not catching it,” Messonnier said.

What about travel? 

The government has banned travelers from 30 countries to the U.S., as of Monday including Ireland and the United Kingdom, and many countries with outbreaks are doing the same, barring Americans as well as other foreign nationals.

The CDC advises against all non-essential travel, domestic or foreign. And, “If you have heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, it is not a great idea for you to get on any kind of flight,” Messonnier said.

The CDC, U.S. State Department and World Health Organization (WHO) websites have up-to-date travel information.

How is the coronavirus spreading?

Most of what experts know is largely based on what is known about similar coronaviruses. When person-to-person transmission occurred with Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes from an infected person were the likely culprit, according to the CDC. Those droplets can land in the mouths or noses of nearby people or be inhaled into the lungs.

It may be possible to get COVID-19 by touching a contaminated surface or object and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes, “but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads,” the CDC says.

Health officials are still working to better understand how easily the virus is spread from person to person. It may be possible for an infected person to spread the virus before exhibiting symptoms. However, people are thought to be most contagious when they are sick with the symptoms of the virus, the CDC says.

What are the symptoms?

Patients with COVID-19 have reported symptoms similar to other respiratory illnesses, including mild to severe symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath that typically begin two to 14 days after exposure, the CDC reports. Many patients with severe complications from the virus develop pneumonia.

The CDC is asking those with symptoms to call their health care provider or local health department for advice before seeking care to avoid spreading germs to others.

However, if you develop emergency warning signs — pain or pressure in the chest, disorientation or confusion, a blue tint in your face or lips, or difficulty breathing or shortness of breath — get medical attention immediately, health officials warn.

If your doctor suspects COVID-19 and orders a test, Medicare will cover the cost. And several major health insurers have committed to waiving fees for COVID-19 testing and treatment.Q6

The CDC also has tips for what to do if you become infected with COVID-19.

How is it treated?

There is no specific antiviral treatment for COVID-19 at this time, just relief from symptoms. However, a clinical trial is underway to test the safety and efficacy of the drug remdesivir as a potential treatment in adults with COVID-19.

What’s the deal with a vaccine?

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and elsewhere have been working on developing a vaccine for COVID-19 since Chinese health authorities made the genetic sequence of the virus available. But a vaccine is likely a year away, at minimum, from being available to the public.

Why does it take so long?

A vaccine will need to be tested in months long clinical trials to determine its safety and effectiveness in people, explained Anthony Fauci, an immunologist and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the NIH. If the vaccine proves safe and effective in the trials and is rushed through regulatory processes, it will still need to be produced for the masses, which will likely add several more months to the timeline.

Will a flu shot provide protection?

There is no evidence that the flu shot or the pneumococcal vaccination will provide any protection from the coronavirus, Messonnier said. Both, however, will increase your chances of staying healthy. And it’s important to keep in mind that, like COVID-19, the flu can be deadly. The CDC estimates that the flu was responsible for 34,200 deaths in the 2018-19 season.

How can I take care of a sick friend?

Health officials stress that it’s important to take care of sick friends and neighbors in the community — and there’s a way to do so safely. If you are taking food to a neighbor, consider leaving it at the door. Since COVID-19 is passed by respiratory droplets, this will eliminate the chance of the virus spreading.

If you are visiting with someone who has COVID-19, keep a safe distance. Wash your hands often — especially when you leave — and remind the person who is sick to wear a face mask. If appropriate precautions are followed, “you’re perfectly safe to be in the environment with them,” Messonnier said.

“I think it is great we step up to help each other, and there are some commonsense precautions to protect you,” she added.

What about those face masks?

Surgical masks offer some level of protection, but only when worn properly. Experts recommend a snug-fitting N95 respirator, which blocks large-particle droplets and most small particles that are transmitted by coughs and sneezes, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These masks are usually available at most drugstores and home-improvement outlets.

That said, there is no need for them among the general public in the U.S. at this time, Messonnier said. And depleting supplies now will only make preventive efforts more complicated for health care workers and sick individuals if the virus starts spreading in communities.

What, exactly, is the coronavirus?

Coronaviruses, named for their crownlike shape, are a large family of viruses that are common in many species of animals. Several coronaviruses can infect people, according to the CDC. These strains mostly cause cold-like symptoms but can sometimes progress to more complicated lower respiratory tract illnesses, such as pneumonia or bronchitis.

On rare occasion, animal coronaviruses can evolve and spread among humans, as seen with MERS and SARS. The virus at the center of the latest outbreak is being referred to as a novel (new) coronavirus, since it’s something that health officials have not seen before.

To date, COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, has sickened more than 113,000 people and killed more than 4,000 (mostly in China). And the numbers continue to climb.

 

 

Should You Stop Dating During The Coronavirus Pandemic?

Dating apps are taking COVID-19 seriously, so how can you stay safe and still meet someone new?

With the enormous growth of dating app use, I’ve always told singles to move the relationship from online to meeting IRL as soon as possible. However, that strategy needs to be reevaluated with the coronavirus.

Know that all of us in the dating industry take dating safety seriously, especially given so many people’s fear of the unknown path the coronavirus is on, as well as the CDC’s advice to practice “social distancing.”

Several dating apps, including Tinder, have provided in-app pop-ups with safety measures, along with a link to the World Health Organization (WHO) and recommended steps singles can take to stay safe, such as washing their hands frequently, using hand sanitizer, and avoiding large crowds.

With COVID-19 top of mind, how does it change the dating landscape? Can you catch the Coronavirus from kissing or having sex?

For starters, many locations for dates have shut down. From sporting events to concerts and museums, the number of spots ideal for dating has diminished. And yes, you can catch the virus from kissing, as the main way COVID-19 is transmitted is through respiratory droplets, which make their way from infected individuals into the mouth or nose of someone nearby.

Add this information to the equation of meeting someone new for a first date, and suddenly it doesn’t sound so sexy when you’re worrying your date might show up sniffling and you don’t even have a history with this person.

So how do you date in the age of the coronavirus?

Some of you might take a pass on dating altogether, but others can successfully date safely if you consider implementing these measures.

Here are 14 dating dos and dont’s during the novel coronavirus.

Do log on to apps and chat more often with singles, as during times of crisis, the need to create a bond with a potential date is elevated.

Don’t worry about canceling a date. Let the person know you’re like to postpone until you feel safe being in crowds.

Do let your potential date know you’re COVID-19 free before you meet.

Don’t show up on a date wearing a mask and gloves, or it will send your date running for the hills.

Do schedule a facetime date, or an in-app video chat instead of meeting IRL to keep the spark going, or you’ll risk the dreaded slow fade.

Don’t interrogate your date as to when the last time they sneezed, or if they’ve taken the COVID-19 test. It’s not the same convo you should be having about getting tested for STDs.

Do a fist-bump welcome when you meet instead of a hug.

Don’t spend the whole night talking about the coronavirus. Instead, try to keep it light.

Do carry hand sanitizer, and offer some to your date if you’re at a restaurant.

Don’t lean in for a kiss at the end of the night, as a wink will do.

Do proudly wash your hands if you’re out dining on a date.

Don’t stick around if someone near you starts coughing.

Do schedule a Netflix and Chill night if you’ve gone on a few dates already.

While there’s so much we don’t know about the coronavirus, don’t give up on dating and finding love. It’s time to be creative, and you’ve got this.

The coronavirus will force singles to vet their dates with a strong digital eye and will result in a slow-style of dating, which isn’t such a bad idea.