Brooke – Insanity Girl

One time I went on a tinder date with this girl, Brooke. She was smoking hot. We’re talking Instagram fame hot. I start talking to her, we exchange numbers, she sent me some topless pics on snapchat. I’m basically on top of the world.

She calls me a day before we meet up and asks me a lot of weird, way too personal questions. Right off the bat her personality seemed pretty weird but I figured she was just kind of quirky.

I take her out to dinner and this girl has horrible table manners. She tells me all about the guy she had been seeing recently, (like a week before I came to find out) and keeps asking me questions about my money, dick size, if I can do a backflip, all kinds of odd shit.

After we eat I take her to my house to watch a movie or something. There were so many red flags going off in my head about this girls personality, but she was so beautiful I didn’t listen to my conscience. (I never do. Beauty always wins.)

I take her to my house and we start watching movies. This girl gets up out of the seat and starts running around my house! Almost aimlessly. Just sprinting. Not saying anything at all. Just running from place to place, not making eye contact with me and not acknowledging anything I say. I was actually terrified at this point. I wasn’t afraid of getting hurt, I was more afraid because I thought I was watching someone who was just clinically insane. She was just totally disconnected… Anyway, so we got to fooling around a little bit after that and I called it quits.

I once had a cat that did that running around aimlessly thing, so it’s pretty normal. Just let them get it out their system, then they come back to the couch and you can pet them again.

She leaves later that night and I’m still processing what happened.

I keep texting her because I’m an idiot and she’s hot.

For some reason she starts getting angry when I don’t text her back within 5 minutes. Literally 5 minutes pass and she said “Fuck you.” Out of nowhere, for no reason. At this point is when my brain finally kicked in and I blocked her, deleted her number, blocked and deleted her on every other form of social media as well.

Other odd thing about her, she told me one day she ate a whole chicken in one sitting and drank the grease up.

No girl is attractive enough to outweigh insanity.

 

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Paperclipping is the Baffling New Dating Trend Set to Infuriate You

From ‘ghosting’ to ‘love bombing’ and ‘breadcrumbing’, finding romance in the modern age can be a confusing journey.

And the latest dating trend, called ‘paperclipping’, is set to baffle you further.

According to Metro, it’s not an adventurous sex move requiring high levels of flexibility, but the act of receiving a friendly message from an old flame – who ghosted you after a couple of dates – months down the line without any explanation.

The name is inspired by Clippy – the irritating Microsoft Office assistant who used to pop up with advice on Word, often when you least needed it.

Just like the animated paperclip on your computer screen, long-term daters will have encountered those people you see for a couple of weeks, then stop talking to you for no logical reason, and who resurface once more just as you’ve forgotten about them.

Their message will probably be a friendly ‘how are you?’ or ‘what are you up to this weekend?’ – providing no explanation for why they suddenly stopped messaging back in the first place or if they now want a relationship.

It can be tempting to message them back, and try to get to the bottom of their unexpected text.

However, to reply could condone their initial bad behavior and it’s unlikely to end well.

The Clippy-esque act has been enshrined on Instagram by talented Brooklyn-based illustrator Samantha Rothenberg (@violetclair) who reveals the trials and tribulations of being a single woman dating in 2019.

She recently posted an image of three paperclips, reminiscent of the passive aggressive Word tool.

One said in a speech bubble: “Sometimes I pop up for no reason at all. Like now.”

A second said: “See, the truth is, I’m damaged, flaky and not, and not particularly interested in you.”

 

 

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Why is everyone suddenly using the C-word?

A journalist from Canada recently shared a video on Twitter in which she asked people in Manchester their opinion of Tommy Robinson (real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon). Two young people – one male, one female – replied immediately with the word “cunt”. The journalist was taken aback, and the video quickly racked up retweets and comments. So what’s going on here? Is the status of this notorious word changing?

Swearing is power language, a parallel vocabulary packed with emotion and social force. But its effects depend heavily on context: one person’s everyday expletive is another’s strict taboo. These differences also vary greatly across time and place. The strong religious swears in English in the Middle Ages are now mild in most places, though minced versions remain popular (jeepers, cripes, gosh).

Over time, taboos shifted from religion to sex and excretion: fuck, shit and company. Salient among them is cunt. “In the premier league of profanity,” Susie Dent tells us, “cunt has been dominating the table for over two centuries.” Yet it was not originally profane at all. It was once routine enough to appear in street names, surnames, even medical books. “In the 14th century cunt was standard English for the female pudendum,” writes Jane Mills in Womanwords. A century later it was still “the standard way to define vulva”, according to Melissa Mohr in Holy Shit: A Brief History of Swearing.

Attitudes then began to change, and cunt became taboo. Slang lexicographer Eric Partridge notes it was “avoided in written and polite English” – though Shakespeare snuck it in anyway. Later it became obscene by law. Partridge’s forerunner Francis Grose, in his 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, defined it – nastily – as “a nasty name for a nasty thing”. The OED prudishly omitted it from its first edition but caught up in 1972 and has fared better in recent years, adding the adjectives cunted, cunting, cuntish and cunty in March 2014. (The authoritative Green’s Dictionary of Slang catalogues a great variety of such terms.)

“By the early 20th century cunt has acquired a layer of hatred in its meaning,” Kate Warwick writes in an exploration of the word’s offensive power, describing how phonetics and connotation contribute to that effect. Germaine Greer’s influential Female Eunuch (1970) deemed it “the worst name anyone can be called”, and many would still agree. Surveys by broadcasting standards authorities in different English-speaking countries consistently place it at or near the top of their offensiveness charts.

But profanity is determined socially, which traditionally has meant locally, and in certain dialects cunt has little or no shock value. For some speakers of Australian English, Irish English and British (especially Scottish) English, it is an ordinary element of their speech. In Scotland it’s even becoming a pronoun. There are socioeconomic implications: “Even within England,” writes Ally Fogg, “it is used more commonly the further you get (both geographically and socio-politically) from the ruling class and the bourgeoisie.”

Its casual use can be hard to adjust to if your culture categories it as a serious, misogynistic slur. In dialects where cunt is less taboo, it’s often used of men, typically as an insult but also with affection. That doesn’t rid it of its gender-markedness, though (any more than “guys” has become gender neutral) simply because some people use it that way. As Lynne Murphy writes, “The shift from feminine to masculine in BrE is part of a more general tendency to use words for women (or our parts) as the ultimate way to put down a man. Which sums up the status of womanhood in our culture rather neatly.”

There are signs that cunt’s taboo is decreasing slightly in North America, or at least parts of it. Feminist efforts to reclaim it gained momentum through Eve Ensler’s Vagina Monologues, while Michael Adams has tracked its re-appropriation on American TV – though he concludes that the examples don’t yet constitute a trend.

The word’s occurrence in high-profile shows such as Game of Thrones may reduce its profane power, if only a little, but the greater influence of religious and social conservatism will preserve the taboo’s strength. In language use we take our cues from family, friends and peers far more than from pop culture. One swallow doesn’t make a summer, and even a couple of swears doesn’t break a taboo.

 

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Phicklephilly – Tinder Moments

More crazy online dating profiles!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tinder Dating Among Teens: When Swipe-Right Culture Goes to High School – Part 2

Terry downloaded Tinder when she was 17 and it was legal to be on the platform. She was looking to have “random, meaningless sex” after a bad breakup. Like the others, Terry, who is now 22, says that all of her friends were on the app. Unlike them, she listed her real age and ultimately regretted it. Before she abandoned the apps, she had run-ins with men who lied about their age or who wanted to pick her up and take her to an undisclosed location.

“I had horrible experiences,” she says. “I had a lot of guys that wanted to like, pick me up, and meet me in a place that was secluded, and didn’t understand why that was weird or just expected sex right off the bat.”

Terry’s most concerning experiences involved older guys who said they were 25 or 26 and listed a different age in their bio. “Like, why don’t you just put your real age?” she says. “It’s really weird. There are some creeps on there.”

Although there’s no public statistic on fake Tinder profiles, avoiding Tinder scams and spotting fake people on the app is fundamental to the experience of using itAdults know this. Teens don’t. Many see a fun app for meeting people or hooking up. And it’s easy to feel concerned about these minors posing as legal adults to get on a platform that makes it so easy to create a profile — real or fake.

Amanda Rose, a 38-year-old mom and professional matchmaker from New York, has two teenage boys, 15 and 17, and concerns about the way that social media and tech has changed dating. To her knowledge, her kids haven’t dated anyone they met online and they don’t use Tinder (she has the passwords to all of her kids’ phones and social media accounts.) But she’s also had many talks with them about the problem with tech and her concerns.

“We’ve had the talk that the person they are talking to might be posting pictures that are not really them,” she says. “It could be someone fake. You have to be really careful and mindful about who you interact with online.”

Amanda’s also concerned about how much teenagers — and the adult clients with whom she works — resort to the digital in order to repair their relationships or remain connected to the world.

“I’ve noticed, even with my clients, that people go to texting. They don’t pick up the phone and call someone. I talk to my kids about that: about how important it is to actually, pick up the phone and not hide behind a phone or a computer screen,” she says. “Because that’s where you build relationships.”

If you just stay behind text messages, Amanda says, you’re not going to build stronger relationships. Even when her oldest son talks about issues with his girlfriend, she tells him: “Don’t text her. You need to step outside if you don’t want anyone to hear the conversation and pick up the phone and call her.”

Still, certain teenagers who ventured onto Tinder have positive stories. Katie, who asked to be referred to by her first name only for privacy, went to an all-girls Catholic school and had a conservative family. She used the app as a way to figure out her sexual identity and credits it for helping her navigate a new and burgeoning sense of self in a way that didn’t leave her open to hostile teenagers, school staff, or disapproving family members.

“I was not out. I was very, very in the closet,” she says. “It was one of my first ever moments of letting myself kind of even acknowledge that I was bisexual. It felt very safe and private.”

On Tinder, Katie says she saw women from her high school looking for other women. Seeing this helped her feel less alone.

“I was 16 and had no idea that they felt that way,” she says. “They didn’t know I felt that way.”

Katie downloaded Tinder at a volleyball tournament. She was with a bunch of friends. They were all women and all straight.

“I was dealing with having queer feelings and not having anyone to talk to about it. I didn’t feel like I could actually talk to anybody, even my close friends about it at that point. So, I kind of used it more to just figure out what being gay is like, I guess.”

Her experience was freeing. “It didn’t feel threatening to flirt with women, and just figure myself out in a way that involved different people without having to feel like I exposed myself to people who would be unfriendly toward me,” she says.

Katie’s story is both unique and not unique. The trend of queer people using dating apps to enter relationships is well-known. Twice as many LGBTQ+ singles use dating apps than heterosexual people. About half of LGBTQ+ singles have dated someone they met online; 70 percent of queer relationships have begun online. That Katie got on the app when she was 16 is maybe not typical, but she found her first girlfriend on the app, and within a few years, came out to her family. Being able to safely explore her bisexuality in an otherwise hostile environment without coming out publicly until she was ready, Katie says, was “lifesaving.”

To find love and acceptance, one must put themselves out there. For teenagers, those whose lives are basically based around understanding and seeking acceptance, this can be an especially daunting prospect — especially so in an age when digital communication is the norm. So why not jump on Tinder, which requires one-minute of setup to help them sit on the edge of  — or dive directly into — the dating pool?

“There’s that whole thing about not looking like you’re trying, right? Tinder is the lowest effort dating platform, in my opinion. Which also makes it harder to meet people,” says Jenna. “But it doesn’t look like you’re trying hard. All of the other ones don’t seem like that.”

Still, while stories like Jenna’s and Katie’s highlight how the app can provide a useful outlet of self-acceptance, neither young woman used the platform as intended. As Tinder seems to suggest by it’s tagline, “Single is a terrible thing to waste,” the app is for those looking for sex. Fostering connections may be more bug than feature. It’s not reassuring that the best stories about teens using the platform tend to emerge from edge-case scenarios, not from the typical function of the app, which is designed as a sexual outlet, but may also condition its user to accepting certain types of sexual experiences.

“You don’t want industry to be the decider of teen sexuality,” says Dines. “Why would you leave it to a profit-based industry?”

That’s a profound question and not one teens are likely to dwell on. Teens will continue to experiment because, well, that’s what teens do. And if they don’t receive guidance from adults in their lives, their early experiences on platforms like Tinder will shape their approach to adult relationships going forward. More than anything, that may be the hazard teens face on Tinder: the morphing of their own expectations.

“You don’t want to leave it to the [profiteers],” says Dines. “We want more for our kids than that, no matter their sexuality.”

 

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Woman Goes On Tinder Date, Then Man Sends Her Brutal List Of ‘Tips’ Three Months Later

Shocking! The biggest jerk in the world!

Dating can be tough, especially when you’re looking for a match online. Apps like Tinder provide various methods of meeting new people, but unfortunately, you’re never quite sure what you’re going to get. Kimberley Latham-Hawkesford, a 24-year-old Aldi employee, learned this lesson firsthand when she went on a date with (who I would deem) the biggest jerk in the world.

tips-tinder-date-kimberley-latham
Source: Kimberley Latham-Hawkesford/Facebook
Like most single, young women these days, Kimberley was using Tinder when she matched with a potential date.

The two messaged and chatted for a week before deciding to meet up.

Initially, the pair met at a local coffee shop, where things went really well. As a result, her date decided to bring her to a pub where they could grab some food.

Source: Trip Advisor

That’s when things started going downhill.

Kimberley’s date began making concerning comments. The young man asked her if she’d be open to plastic surgery and suggested stores where she could purchase clothes for their next date. When Kimberley offered to pay for the meal, he took offense. According to reports, the young man even pulled up his banking app to show her the balance on the screen.

It was fair to say the night had turned into a total disaster, but like any other horrific dating story, Kimberley figured she’d just never see him again and that would be the end of it— and it was, until three months later.

tips-tinder-date-kimberley-latham
Source: Kimberley Latham-Hawkesford/LADbible

Amongst the ridiculously rude advice, he tells her she should lose weight, get extensions, stop talking about herself, and laugh at his jokes— but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

“Hello Kimberley,” he wrote.

“I know we went on a date quite a while ago now but I’d like to explain why I haven’t messaged you. I feel like you could have made the date much better, here’s [sic] a few reasons why. I apologize if I offend you.”

From here, the bullet-pointed list of advice began:

“If you lost some weight you would look incredible. Maybe about a stone or so.”

“You are very pale. I know you aren’t a fan of the sun, but a bit of a fake tan won’t hurt.”

“You have quite big boobs so you should show off your cleavage more.”

“I think you need to wear clothes that suit your figure and maybe update your style slightly. Just so I’m not embarrassed to be seen with you.”

“You need to dye your hair a normal color and add extensions. Longer hair is much more attractive.”

“You need to look more natural, stop wearing makeup. Just make yourself look decent but don’t overkill it.”

“Your lips have gone down so you should think of getting more filler. I know you said you regretted it but filler would make you sexier.”

“You need so much more confidence, confidence is sexy!”

“The fact that you take things slow makes you look like a prude. I didn’t get a kiss which messed with my ego. Be more sensitive to others’ feelings.”

“When we had food, I know you got a salad but having a full-fat coke is more calories you really don’t need.”

“You need to keep your past to a minimum. I don’t care about it and what you went through.”

“Get a sense of humor. You didn’t laugh at a single one of my jokes.”

“You just seemed a bit stuck up. Sort your personality out.”

“You made me feel like shit when you offered to pay. It’s like you thought I didn’t have enough money after telling you how much is in my account.”

“You didn’t compliment me once.”

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Source: Kimberley Latham-Hawkesford/LADbible

When Kimberley posted the message to Facebook, it went viral for obvious reasons.

Luckily, although she admits she was initially “mortified” by the list, she now finds humor in the scenario: “The more I read it, the funnier it became. I couldn’t understand how a guy could say such things to a woman.”

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

 

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Special Report: Teens accused in plot to lure men in on Tinder and then rob them at gunpoint

Tinder stressed in its guidelines the importance of spending time talking on the app and meeting in a populated space.

Five teens have been arrested for a string of armed robberies against men who believed they were meeting up with a woman they had met on Tinder, police said.

Bryan Gonzalez, 19; Jonathan Jimenez, 18; Lesly Portillo, 18; Yarida Villareal, 19; and an unidentified 15-year-old male were arrested separately in San Jose, California. Police say they were booked on multiple charges, including robbery, carjacking, auto theft and hit and run.

The group created fake profiles on the Tinder dating app under the names Becky or Victoria, police said in a news release. They would communicate with men on the app and convince them to meet up.

“The times and locations were usually in the late evening hours on secluded streets near a park,” the release said.

Instead of Becky or Victoria, police said, several masked suspects would meet the victims and beat them, rob them, and carjack them at gunpoint.

The adult suspects are being held in Santa Clara County Jail and the minor was booked into Santa Clara County Juvenile Hall.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Detective Amanda Estantino of the San Jose Police Department’s Robbery Unit at 408-277-4166.

Tinder’s safety guidelines encourage users to take precautions when meeting people offline.

“Bad actors often push people to communicate off the platform immediately,” the company said. “Meet for the first time in a populated, public place — never in a private or remote location, and never at your home or apartment. If your date pressures you, end the date and leave at once.”