Farrah Fawcett’s final days remembered by Jaclyn Smith, other friends in new documentary

“I love you, Farrah.”

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Nearly 10 years after her death, loved ones are sharing new details about Farrah Fawcett’s final days in a documentary set to premiere Thursday night.

Fawcett, whose acting credits include the ’70s hit TV show “Charlie’s Angels” and 1984 TV movie “The Burning Bed,” was born on February 2, 1947, in Corpus Christi.

In 1965, Fawcett enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin. The following year, she moved to Los Angeles to begin modeling and acting, according to a press release from ABC News.

Fawcett, who earned an Emmy Award and six Golden Globe Award nominations during her successful career, was diagnosed with cancer in 2006. She died three years later.

“This is Farrah Fawcett,” a two-hour special, presents rare footage from the intimate video diaries of Fawcett’s fight against cancer.

It also features Barbara Walters’ interviews with Fawcett and actor Ryan O’Neal, the actress’ partner at the time of her death.

As well, some of Fawcett’s closet friends were interviewed, including Houston-born actress Jaclyn Smith, Alana Stewart, hairstylist Mela Murphy and photographer Bruce McBroom, according to the release.

Dr. Lawrence Piro, Fawcett’s primary physician, and Dr. Ursula Jacob, Fawcett’s physician in Germany who used alternative treatments for her cancer, were also interviewed.

In clips of the forthcoming documentary, Smith said Fawcett’s relationship with actor Ryan O’Neal was volatile and spontaneous.

“It was everything that made a relationship not boring,” Smith said.

Stewart recalled how no one was prepared to hear that the Hollywood star had been diagnosed with cancer.

“Farrah was the Golden Girl to everyone so it was such a shock, to the whole world, when she got cancer,” Stewart said. “It kind of goes to show you that you know, cancer doesn’t play favorites.”

Stewart helped record Fawcett’s experience with cancer, including the day the icon said goodbye to her signature feathered hairstyle by shaving her own head.

“It was very important for Farrah to shave her own head so that she was removing her hair, and cancer treatment wasn’t removing her hair,” Piro said.

“It’s kind of like that fine line between being a victim and a victor.”

At the end of her three-year battle, Fawcett declined quickly and suddenly, Stewart said.

“She started to hemorrhage, she had an infection. One thing led to another and she ended up back in the hospital,” said Stewart.

“We kind of knew there wasn’t going to be a miracle at this point.”

Fawcett passed away on June 25, 2009, in Santa Monica, California, with O’Neal and Stewart by her side. She was 62 years old.

 

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Tales of Rock – The Offspring Lead Singer Dexter Holland is a Pretty Awesome Dude!

I loved researching this story! One of my favorites!

Bryan “Dexter” Holland is the kind of dude who, if he can’t get into a rock show, grabs a buddy and starts The Offspring. Half a decade later, he was signed with Epitaph Records to join NOFX and Rancid, with whom his band is partly credited for bringing punk rock back into the angst-dripping hearts of suburban kids who really don’t have much to complain about except the emptiness of their idle middle-class lives. To go down that road, however, he had to give up a pretty straight-arrow career path of over-achieving drudgery that probably would have given him some of his best moody material–and a sick minivan to go with it.

Dexter, as it turns out, grew up in the high-rent suburbs West Garden Grove, California.

He went to Pacifica High School and, instead of setting fires and declaring anarchy, went ahead and graduated as valedictorian instead. He went on to the University of Southern California, became a pre-med student and eventually got his Master’s Degree in molecular biology. (WOW!) He was actually on the way to a Ph.D. before dropping out to follow his dream of throwing glistening globs of his own biological molecules all over screaming audiences night after night.

In his spare time he decided to also become a licensed airline pilot and flew himself around the world. Hey, why not?

Dexter Holland is one awesome dude!

 

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Tales of Rock – Love Me Plenty, Presley Pleads

I love that photo of Elvis.

Jan. 8 will be the 85th anniversary of the birth of Elvis Presley. Don’t fear that this milestone will be celebrated too quietly. Elvis 75 (a shorthand moniker for the event itself, as well as the title of a new greatest-hits collection) will bring an onslaught of commemorative festivities and products, like parties at Graceland, concerts with Elvis impersonators and a movie suggesting that Presley, who died on Aug. 16, 1977, has spent the last three decades in outer space. It will bring everything except realistic thoughts of what the uncontrollably self-destructive Elvis might have been like as a 75-year-old man.

Naturally, there are books. Lots and lots of books. Among the standouts — beyond a tell-all by the doctor who knows a lot about Presley’s death and a hagiography from the lifelong buddy who is fond of saying that America has had many presidents but only one King — is Alanna Nash’s long look at Elvis’s bizarre history with women. She has cleverly borrowed one of his most seductive song titles, “Baby, Let’s Play House.”

Since Ms. Nash’s book is studiously annotated and longer than many biographies of American presidents, there is reason to think she may have done some serious work here. Also, she approaches this subject with a running start. As the author of “The Colonel,” about the carny tricks of Presley’s famously Machiavellian manager, Col. Tom Parker, as well as “Elvis and the Memphis Mafia,” she sounds like someone well connected in the Presley world. So it is only a little bit worrisome to see her identified in the jacket copy for her new book as “the first journalist to see Elvis Presley in his casket.”

Elvis Presley and his wife, Priscilla, at their 1967 Las Vegas wedding. He had unusually close ties to his mother, Gladys. Credit Doc Pele/Stills, Retna

That whiff of morbid curiosity turns out to be determinative. So does the genesis of “Baby, Let’s Play House”: Ms. Nash acknowledges that she initially wrote a women-oriented article for Ladies’ Home Journal and then decided to expand it. Thus armed with what she all too aptly calls “an oral history of some of the women in Elvis’s life,” Ms. Nash began padding her story with three kinds of material: her own legitimate interviews (some with women still pining for Elvis 50 years after their fateful encounters), secondhand gossip (from self-serving memoirs and fan publications) and psychobabble. Cobbled together, these elements led her along Presley’s long, winding trail from babes to baby sitters as his life spiraled into sad decline.

“Baby, Let’s Play House” is abundantly illustrated with pictures of Presley with his girlfriends. And the pictures tell a powerful story. He worked his way through a lifetime’s worth of women who looked like his brown-haired, soulful-eyed mother, Gladys. At first they were girls next door. Then, though still from the same cookie cutter, they became ever more beautiful as Elvis’s star rose, to the point where he paired up with women almost as good-looking as he was.

Ms. Nash tells a long, repetitive and dirt-digging version of that dramatic tale. Her central premise, supplied by Peter O. Whitmer (“The Inner Elvis”) in his capacity as this book’s resident psychologist and buttressed by terms like “individuate,” “stuck grief,” “sexual dimorphism” and “estrogen-androgen balance,” is that Presley’s loss of a twin brother at birth set him on a lifelong search for companionship he could never truly find and that his extreme closeness to his mother left no room for other adult women.

Using details too tawdry for even the most voyeuristic fans, the author offers evidence of her subject’s arrested sexual development, physical insecurities and general predilection for the 14-year-old girls who struck him as unthreatening. Sometimes he really did throw pajama parties and teach girls how to put on eye makeup and style their hair.

Some details in “Baby, Let’s Play House” invoke the bottom-feeding biographical style of Albert Goldman. And Ms. Nash, in playing to the rubbernecking crowd, is not shy about using Mr. Goldman as a source. She also replays the memories of each girlfriend who believed herself to be Elvis’s true love (“I was the one who got away”), the creative stylings of too many ghostwriters and the fairy-tale tone of Priscilla Presley, Elvis’s wife. (“I thought I was living inside a dream. Except the dream had come true. I had come home with Elvis.”) Although Ms. Nash usually plays fair with attributions, she sometimes creates the misimpression that material borrowed from fan Web sites is a) current and b) her own.

But she has done her own dogged research too. And some of it is memorably succinct and tough. Consider this near haiku from Patti Parry, the lone female buddy in Elvis’s inner circle: “Nineteen-year-old truck driver becomes superstar and super stud, which he wasn’t.” Or this from Lamar Fike, one of his closest associates: “I’ll give you Elvis’s relationship with Priscilla in a nutshell. You create a statue. And then you get tired of looking at it.” Or from Sheila Ryan Caan, one of the rare girlfriends who felt free to tease Elvis about his sartorial style: “Does Cruella know you have her cape tonight?”

Regardless of how Ms. Nash accrued and assembled this material, she manages to collect all the madness, badness and sadness of the Elvis myth in one exhaustive and (let’s face it) embarrassingly tempting volume. Though she is sure to be excoriated for leaving the emperor unclothed, she also writes with admiration. And after presenting an endless-seeming parade of consorts (he had declined from young starlets to young bank tellers in his final months), Ms. Nash gets the last word on girl-chasing from Elvis at his weariest.

“Why the hell do you put up with her?” Billy Smith, Presley’s cousin and entourage member, tells Ms. Nash that he asked Elvis about Ginger Alden, the consort who was asleep in the next room when he died. Said the King, “I’m just getting too old and tired to train another one.”

 

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Tales of Rock – Former Rolling Stone, Bill Wyman says he was ’stupid to ever think’ marriage to teen bride would work

Rock star Bill Wyman (52) of The Rolling Stones pop group, kisses his new bride, the former Mandy Smith (19) outside St. John’s church, London, England on June 5, 1989. The couple were married in secret on June 2 at a civil service and the second ceremony was to bless the marriage in church. (AP Photo/David Caulkin) (David Caulkin/AP)

At the time, wild horses couldn’t drag him away — but now former Rolling Stone Bill Wyman admits regret over marrying Mandy Smith in 1989 when she was just 18 and he was 52.

In the controversial documentary “The Quiet One,” which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival Thursday night, Wyman, now 82, says he was “stupid to ever think it could possibly work.”

The film, which makes use of the meticulously kept photos, film footage and memorabilia from the rocker’s personal archives, was pulled from England’s Sheffield Doc/Fest next month because of his scandalous relationship with Smith. The pair met when she was 13 and he was 47 in the mid-80s. And though Smith was of legal age when they married, following their divorce a few years later, she claimed they first had sex when she was just 14.

Rock star Bill Wyman (52) of The Rolling Stones pop group, kisses his new bride, the former Mandy Smith (19) outside St. John’s church, London, England on June 5, 1989. The couple were married in secret on June 2 at a civil service and the second ceremony was to bless the marriage in church. (AP Photo/David Caulkin) (D. Caulkin)

Wyman and Smith split in 1991 just two years after their marriage, and then finalized their divorce two years later.

In “The Quiet One,” Wyman defends the relationship, saying, “It was from the heart. It wasn’t lust, which people were seeing it as.”

But he also admits, “I was really stupid to ever think it could possibly work. She was too young. I felt she had to go out and see life for a bit.”

In 2013, following other prominent sex scandals in England, Wyman said that he offered to be interviewed by authorities about his relationship with Smith. “I went to the police and I went to the public prosecutor and said, ‘Do you want to talk to me? Do you want to meet up with me, or anything like that?’ And I got a message back, ‘No.’”

Wyman, a founding member of the Rolling Stones, played bass guitar for the legendary rock band from 1962 until 1993.

“The Quiet One,” written and directed by British filmmaker Oliver Murray, features plenty of footage and photos from his years with the Stones. But it also touches on his family life growing up in working-class London, including the tension he had with his father who pulled him out of school to work for a bookie to help support the family.

Wyman also expresses the love he had for his grandmother, who he lived with on and off as an adolescent, and was the only family member who showed him affection, he says.

In the film, the bass player addresses his womanizing in the early days of the Stones’ success and admits that was partially to blame for the split from his first wife, Diane, who he was married to between 1959 and 1969. He and Diane had a son Stephen, who Wyman won custody of when he felt that his ex wasn’t properly taking care of him, he says.

Wyman married his third and current wife Suzanne Accosta in 1993 and they share three daughters.

Jerry Hall, the former longtime romantic partner of Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger, was in the audience at the film’s premiere, along with her husband, media mogul Rupert Murdoch. Also in the house at the SVA Theatre in Chelsea were Wyman’s wife, Suzanne Accosta, and their youngest daughter, Matilda.

 

 

‘World’s Hottest Weather Girl’ Yanet Garcia Turns Heads In Curve-Hugging Dress

With another new day comes another sexy photo from weather girl Yanet Garcia.

As fans of the brunette bombshell know, the Mexico native has been named the “World’s Hottest Weather Girl” by her fans. Since gaining fame a few years ago, Yanet has already amassed an insane following on Instagram, having over 10.3 million fans on that platform alone. Garcia is well-known for showing off her amazing figure to fans in bikinis, workout gear, and sexy dresses that she wears to work. But it’s her latest post that really has her fans turning their heads to do a double take.

In this new snapshot, the 28-year-old stands on a metal staircase at the TV studio where she works. The stunner poses in profile, showing off her curvy figure in a green dress with horizontal black-and-white stripes. The sexy dress also features a high slit, showing off plenty of leg. The bombshell wears her long dark locks down and straight, and completes the sultry outfit with a pair of high-heeled black ankle boots that accentuate her legs.

Since the post went live on Garcia’s account, it’s earned her rave reviews, attracting over 283,000 likes in addition to 1,000-plus comments. Some followers took to the post to let Garcia know that they are huge fans, while countless others couldn’t help but comment on her amazing physique.

“Amazing curves,” one follower wrote, adding a heart-eyed emoji.

“Gorgeous mami keep doing what u [sic] do,” a second supporter urged.

“Stunning dress and lovely,” another fan wrote, capping off their brief remark with green heart emoji.

Last week, Garcia posted plenty of sexy photos for her 10 million-plus followers — including a few from her place of work. As The Inquisitr shared, the 28-year-old showed off her assets to her army of followers while clad in a pair of insanely tiny white shorts.

The brunette beauty’s toned legs are fully on display in this particular photo, with her leg muscles taking center stage. Garcia’s skimpy shorts hug all of her curves, and she completes her outfit with a barely-there crop top which showcases plenty of cleavage. To complete the hot look, the beauty wears her long dark locks down and curled, as well as a beautiful bit of makeup.

Like her most recent post, this one also earned Garcia rave reviews, garnering over 500,000 likes in addition to 2,800-plus comments — a number that continues to grow.

Fans can keep up with Garcia by giving her a follow on Instagram.

 

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Tales of Rock – In Search Of The Forgotten Heroes Of 70s Rock

Oh, I love this so much!

We all know about the 70s. The Beatles quit, glam came along — T.RexBowie, Slade; in the background, Floyd, Zeppelin and Sabbath sold squillions of records as 70s rock icons. Yes, ELP, Mike Oldfield and Genesis did prog for educated chaps. Then disco: ELO, ABBA and Queencompeted with it, then joined it. Punk rebelled, then came post-punk and Joy Division, plus 2-Tone. There was other stuff, like Bob Marley and Eagles. And we wore platform-heeled hot pants. Cool. Perhaps.

But are the 2010s only about Adele and Ed Sheeran? Beneath their mass appeal lies hundreds of other acts making great music. It was the same for 70s rock coulda-beens: brilliant bands rocked audiences of thousands, made fantastic albums, then faded. Fondly remembered by a troupe of diehards, these acts are almost ignored by the rock’n’roll historians — though many deserved to be lauded like their celebrated contemporaries. Here are but a few: remember them with love, or discover them afresh.

It wasn’t enough for Focus to boast a brilliant guitarist in Jan Akkerman; they had a wily way with a tune and succeeded with an unfashionable form of rock: instrumentals. Focus were The Netherlands’ leading 70s rock band. Formed in 1969, they won attention through early single ‘House Of The King’. The theme for four UK TV series(!), the unwary might have mistaken it for a Jethro Tull ditty thanks to the flute of Thijs Van Leer, though his group were very different. Their second album, 1971’s II, was Focus’ breakthrough, delivering an international hit in the fierce ‘Hocus Pocus’. Their third album delivered the elegant descending melody of ‘Sylvia’, winning further fans worldwide, with Akkerman drawing admiration. The guitarist left in 1976 but returned several times; Focus are still on the road.

 

Akkerman wasn’t alone: the 70s adored a guitar hero. Robin Trower, formerly of Procol Harum, was seen by some listeners as the heir to Jimi Hendrix. Trower formed his own power trio in 1973, teasing weeping and wailing from his Stratocaster over a series of fine records, and riding high in the album chart with Bridge Of Sighs in ’74 and For Earth Below in ’75 — chiefly in the US, rather than his native UK. Another notable guitar band were Wishbone Ash, though they went one further, with the double lead axes and vocals of Andy Powell and Ted Turner mesmerising fans. Pilgrimage (1971) and Argus (1972) were 70s rock classics, mixing melody, blues and a mythological element. Their ‘Blowin’ Free’ was banned from some guitar shops which grew sick of budding strummers playing its intro. Among them was Steve Harris, heartbeat of Iron Maiden, for whom the Ash was a major influence.

The second-division 70s rock bands were not remotely generic. Behind the sleeve artwork of famed designer Roger Dean, Osibisa played Afro-rock that mixed Ghanaian highlife, searing rock and Caribbean grooves; ignore their biggest hit, ‘Sunshine Day’, and check out their eponymous debut LP and its ’74 follow-up, Woyaya: both made loon pants rave. The Strawbs blended folk (Sandy Denny was an early member, as was Rick Wakeman) with rock, glam and social comment, hitting with ‘Part Of The Union’ and ‘Lay Down’ in 1972. The band were too diverse for its own good, though Just A Collection Of Antiques And Curios (1970) and Grave New World (’72) were widely played and respected. And spare a thought for the Illinois singer-songwriter Emitt Rhodes, a multi-tracking one-man-band given the tag of “the new Paul McCartney”. Gulp. His second, self-titled, album is so full of beautiful, melodic tunes, tending to the baroque, that it’s baffling that it only made №29 in the US in 1970. Talent? You bet.

 

The harmonious progressive rock of California quartet Ambrosia illuminated the second half of the 70s. Their imaginative eponymous debut (1975) adapted a Kurt Vonnegut poem for the single ‘Nice, Nice, Very Nice’, while ‘Holdin’ On To Yesterday’, an orchestrated beauty with the sort of beat now regarded as a downtempo groove, was a big US hit. The following year, Somewhere I’ve Never Travelled sent FM DJs quietly wild; further fame came when the group cut ‘Magical Mystery Tour’ for the Beatles/war documentary oddity All This And World War II. Scoring warm soul-styled hits in the 80s, these alluring soft rockers are still touring.

The wonderful Atlanta Rhythm Section faced one drawback: their acronym was ARS. But they made it. No prizes for guessing where they’re from. They delivered five albums between 1972–76, with little fuss and low sales figures: that changed in 1977 when ‘So Into You’, a cool, steady-chugging chunk of soulful Southern rock, went Top 10 in the US, bringing their A Rock And Roll Alternative with it. The next year they scored again with ‘Imaginary Lover’ and the strolling ‘I’m Not Going To Let It Bother Me Tonight’, both from the platinum-selling Champagne Jam. Further hits came courtesy of ‘Do It Or Die’ and a revival of ‘Spooky’ — two members of the band had been in Classics IV, who’d first hit with the in ’67. ARS were a class act.

Want something that blends with them? Try ‘Jackie Blue’ (1974), the biggest hit by Missouri’s Ozark Mountain Daredevils. Mixing AOR with country-influenced sounds (check out the boogie of ‘If You Want To Get To Heaven’) and a sense of the absurd (their third LP was called The Car Over The Lake Album, and the sleeve showed just that), they were a reliably fine time on vinyl between 1973–80.

 

Staying in the south, Wet Willie were named after a schoolyard prank but were no joke. From Alabama, they boasted five or six core members, plus backing singers The Williettes, who included British solo star Elkie Brooks for a while. Their biggest hit was the laconic, steady-rollin’ ‘Keep On Smilin’’ in 1974, title track to their fourth album. For the full blast of their grittily funky rock, however, try the previous year’s superb live set, Drippin’ Wet. And let’s also recall Manassas, who cut two fine albums in 1972–73. And they would be fine, since they were the vision of a bona fide superstar, Steven Stills, and featured Chris Hillman of The Byrds and Flying Burrito Brothers amid an array of truly great players. The group’s self-titled debut offered four sides of glorious rootsy country-rock — and whatever else took their fancy. Everyone involved thought the band was amazing, so why weren’t they bigger? Perhaps because fans wanted Crosby, Stills & Nash, instead.

At the opposite end of the fame spectrum, British 70s rock band Brinsley Schwarz, named after their guitarist, were famously over-hyped when flown to NYC to open at the Fillmore East in front of a gaggle of music hacks, but settled into a low-key country-rock and roots vibe that was a cornerstone of London pub-rock. Building a loyal, if small, following, they toured constantly, supported the likes of Wings and Dave Edmunds, but disbanded unheralded in 1975, leaving us half a dozen albums such as the country-inclined Nervous On The Road. Most members went on to success, notably bassist and songwriter Nick Lowe, who produced The Damned and Elvis Costello, was part of Dave Edmunds’ Rockpile, and wrote Dr Feelgood’s biggest hit, ‘Milk And Alcohol’. Another downbeat hero, Scottish guitarist Miller Anderson, breathed blues-fuelled fire into records by Keef Hartley Band, Savoy Brown, Ian Hunter, Jon Lord and many more. His sole solo set of the 70s, Bright City, on Decca’s progressive Deram imprint, was ambitious, thoughtful and had a theme concerning 70s urban life, with brilliant orchestral arrangements. It sold… not at all. A dirty rotten shame, as Anderson’s under-exposed vocal talent deserved exposure.

 

Prog stars Camel, led by guitarist/flautist Andy Latimer and featuring keyboardist Peter Bardens, cut Camel for MCA in ’72, featuring the climactic gem ‘Never Let Go’. Swapping to Deram, Mirage found a following in the US, and 1975’s instrumental suite, The Snow Goose, became a surprise runaway success, despite a dispute with Paul Gallico, the author of the kids’ book of the same name, involving an unseemly mix-up about whether the band were related to the cigarette brand (they weren’t). The following year’s Moonmadness was another hit amid various line-up changes, and the group kept charting until 1984.

Another act who had to earn it, baby, were prog stalwarts Barclay James Harvest, a quartet who got through five albums without pestering the Top 40, finally scoring with Live, a double set that reflected a fanbase built on hard graft. LPs such as Everyone Is Everyone ElseOctoberonand Time Honoured Ghosts are classics of their type, with great songs such as ‘Mocking Bird’ and the wry ‘Poor Man’s Moody Blues’ undeservedly little heard today. Then there’s Gentle Giant, who grew (and grew) from the psychedelic-era act Simon Dupree & The Big Sound (and late-60s curiosity The Moles) into one of the most reliable progressive bands of the 70s. While they barely hit in their native UK, a decade of albums on Vertigo label and Chrysalis won a strong following in the US, with Free Hand going Top 50, and the likes of Octopusand The Power And The Glory proving fascinating those with ears to hear.

 

Finally, two more British 70s rock bands who, sadly, barely registered: Spring, a highly melodious five-piece whose charming self-titled 1971 album is mostly recognised for copious use of the Mellotron (without sounding remotely like The Moody Blues). What ought to be more noted, however, are the heartfelt and distinctive vocals of Pat Moran, who went on to produce Iggy Pop, among many others. And should you think T2 is just a movie, you haven’t heard It’ll All Work Out In Boomland, a legendary progressive album that should have made stars of the trio that recorded it. If you want to know where Neil Young and Bowie meet, hear T2’s singer-drummer Peter Dunton, and you’ll also enjoy the tough guitar stylings of Keith Cross. Despite BBC sessions and an 80s reunion, fame proved elusive for the group. 70s rock fans didn’t know how lucky they were.

This has been one of my favorite Tales of Rock to write. These are glorious songs from my past that were nearly forgotten, but I resurrect them here for you to witness!

Enjoy!

 

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Tales of Rock – Steven Adler’s Brother Reveals Why Guns N’ Roses Are ‘Greedy And Inhumane’

Original Guns N’ Roses drummer Steven Adler’s brother Jamie has posted the following on a Guns N’ Roses Facebook group.

“This man right here is what you call a true survivor. He went all the way to the depths of hell and was able to make it back alive. When most died he lived. What an amazing story of redemption my brother has to tell. Salute to the greatest big brother/ grooviest drummer I’ve ever known. This man has a heart of gold. The biggest heart of anyone in his caliber. The most humble, loving, gracious person I’ve and anyone else who’s ever met him has known. If only Slash, Axl, and Duff had 10% of the heart this man had then maybe he would be on tour with GNR.

If those guys had an ounce of decency, compassion, love, care, and acceptance maybe they would have allowed my brother to play more then one song in Argentina after they flew him all the way out there and TEASED him to only play one song. ONE SONG ONLY!! The only thing the fans wanna see is Adler back behind the kit especially since the world knows Adler is no longer on drugs or alcohol. It took him longer to drive down the hill from his house to the bottom then he was allowed to perform on stage in Argentina. What kind of inhumane people would ever be that cruel to someone?? Greedy, selfish people only.

With out Steven Adler there would never have been GNR or the greatest rock album of all time. Adler did teach Slash his first guitar chord and gave him his first guitar. For all we know if Slash never met Adler he may have never even found the guitar. People forget to often where they come from. Let’s remind Slash right now how he picked up even being the greatest guitar player of our generation. Steven Adler handing you your first guitar. Facts!! Adler’s groove made that album what it is today. That’s why No other drummer since Adler has been able to duplicate that sound in GNR. It’s a gift from God not any drum lesson can teach you what he was born with.

They have no heart so that’s why he has to go out and do his own thing. He loves his fans so much and he wants to play for each and everyone of you. Do you actually think Steven Adler got sober and Changed his entire life style to sit around the house and do nothing? NOPE!! He did it, so he can finish what he started. My brother is stronger then ever and will show the world once again this May when he begins his world wide tour with his own band. You would think the guys in GNR would be overly proud that their once fallen brother has returned to health and happiness and would want to share their new found success with him this time around.

Well, my brother is alive and well so it’s never too late. I write this because I see a lot of fans making comments on why is Adler doing his own thing and not with GNR. Please ask GNR that Adler would love to be back on stage with GNR. That’s his dream. He’s never been healthier and more alive as you see in all his pics. For those who struggle with addiction and Life issues my brother is an example and inspiration that you can turn your life around and Live a life beyond your wildest imagination. If he can clean up then it proves anyone can. I send all my love and respect to all who read this and love it or those who may disagree with what I said. I felt it was necessary to get this off my chest. GNR is and always will be the greatest 5 piece Rock n Roll band of my generation. I’m just grateful I was a little part of it. My brother is alive and well today and I want the whole world to know this.”

 

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