Tales of Rock – Little Known Beatles Fun Facts

Sorry folks. This was a bit of a misfire on phicklephilly. Normally Tales of Rock runs every Sunday at 8am, but somehow I scheduled it for 8pm by accident. Hence the late release. Sorry about that, Tales of Rock fans, but here it is.

Stu Sutliffe was the group member who gave them the name Beetles with John Lennon changing the name.

When Vee Jay Records first began to release the Beatles early hit songs in the U.S., they compiled them on an album with the Four Seasons, titling the LP The International Battle of the Century.

It took the Beatles just twelve hours to record their first album, Please Please Me in 1963. Four years later in 1967 it took the band over 700 hours to record Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

When Vee Jay records released Please Please Me, their first Beatles single in the U.S. in 1963, the band’s name was misspelled on the record label as The Beattles. (What’s that 45 worth today, I wonder?)

The last album that the Beatles recorded together was not the last album released. Abbey Road was the final recording of the Beatles, yet Let It Be was released after it. (If you look at the cover of that album, the band is not even together in the photo. It’s four separate pictures of the boys)

Most Beatle fans can recall the group’s drummer to Ringo Starr. (Real name, Richard Starkey) It was Pete Best who was fired to make room for Starr, who had been the drummer for Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. But prior to Best, who drummed for the Beatles?

First there was Tommy Moore who was forced to quit the band by his girlfriend! Then there was a six-foot two Norman Chapman, and excellent musician, who had to leave the Beatles upon being drafted into the British Army. That brings up to Pete Best.

 

I know this is brief, but its a handful of fun fact about the greatest band of the 20th century. 

I’ll write more in the future about this wonderful musical phenomenon.

Please watch the documentary on Netflix called: How the Beatles Changed the World.

It’s wonderful!

 

 

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Tales of Rock – Bob Dylan, The Beatles, and a Joint

During the event it was reported that Epstein said “I’m so high I’m on the ceiling. I’m up on the ceiling.”

In late August of 1964, The Beatles started their first official U.S. tour. The group began at Cow Palace in San Francisco and finished at the Paramount Theatre in New York. On August 28-29 The Beatles played at Forest Hills Stadium in New York and were befriended by Bob Dylan. The two parties were introduced by the writer Al Aronowitz at New York’s Delmonico Hotel.

After a brief chat with The Beatles, Bob Dylan asked John, Paul, Ringo, George, and Brian Epstein if they wanted to smoke a joint. Epstein looked apprehensive and said that the band hadn’t tried marijuana for years. Dylan was immediately surprised because he had been under the impression that they smoked weed because of the song I Want to Hold Your Hand. He mistook the lyrics “I can’t hide” with “I get high.”

The Beatles were never one to back down from a new experience and agreed. Lennon took the joint and passed it to Ringo whom he called his “royal taster.” Ringo smoked the entire thing, not knowing the tradition of sharing the joint between people. In response, Dylan rolled a joint for each of The Beatles and they smoked. During the event it was reported that Epstein said “I’m so high I’m on the ceiling. I’m up on the ceiling.” McCartney got more philosophical and asked Mal Evans to write down everything he was saying.

 

Thank you for reading my blog. Please read, like, comment, and most of all follow Phicklephilly. I publish Monday through Friday at 8am EST.

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