Federal Judge Blocks Mississippi Abortion Law

A federal judge blocked a Mississippi law on Friday that forbids abortion after the detection of a fetal heartbeat, as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

In issuing a preliminary injunction, Judge Carlton Reeves said the law “threatens immediate harm to women’s rights, especially considering most women do not seek abortions services until after six weeks.”

“Allowing the law to take effect would force the clinic to stop providing most abortion care,” wrote Reeves, adding that “by banning abortions after the detection of a fetal heartbeat, the law prevents a woman’s free choice, which is central to personal dignity and autonomy.”

The law was set to take effect in July.

Supporters of abortion rights argue the law collides with Supreme Court precedent, violating a woman’s right to seek an abortion prior to viability.

The law is part of a new wave of restrictions introduced by Republican-led states — emboldened by President Donald Trump — to introduce legislation that calls into question Supreme Court precedent. The laws, none of which have gone into effect in 2019, triggered protests across the country on Tuesday, the same day Reeves heard arguments in Mississippi.

Critics worry that with the appointment of Justice Brett Kavanaugh to take the seat of swing vote retired Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Supreme Court might eventually move to cut back on its landmark opinion Roe V. Wade, if not gut the 1973 decision.

The-CNN-Wire

& © 2019 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

 

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Theresa – Halloween

 

Here’s another random blast from the distant past…

There was a girl at the place I worked. She claimed she had an abusive boyfriend. I encouraged her to leave him because she didn’t deserve that. She says she left him and needs someone to talk to. We go out a few times. We start seriously dating. We have a stupid five month anniversary date planned for Halloween.

She calls and says she can’t make it on account of work and will be too tired afterwards. The next day she calls me over to talk. (That’s never good) When I get there she informs me that she wasn’t at work she was fucking her ex all day and they’re getting back together. We get into a shouting match. She’s not responsible; Bullshit. They have history; Yeah, he hit her. He never really hit her; Lying snake. Why am I so mad; Because she’s a trollop. And so on. I left (Yes, in the heat of the moment I wanted to hit her. (Not really!) That’s why I left. Should I be applauded for that? No, it’s just something that happened. I shouldn’t have ever admitted to feeling anything. I’m sorry.) and she spent the day begging me to come back. I refused to speak to her because I was angry and confused and needed some space.

Naturally when she can’t reach me she calls into work and claims I sexually assaulted her. I don’t know this, go to work, and get taken aside. The company is concerned about the allegations and wants to call the cops. I swear it was an ongoing relationship, completely consensual, and they didn’t need to call the cops. They point out we’re still both employees and the company can’t have us both working there if it is true. There are liabilities to consider and the police will sort everything out. I’ll just sit in jail for a couple of days while they do that. So, I offer to quit in exchange for them not calling the police as I really didn’t want to go to jail. I was in an independent contractor position. I didn’t even really work for them. The company didn’t need to get involved. This is a private issue. They agree and let me go under the condition that if they ever see me again they’re calling the cops on me for harassing her. I go home, crawl into bed and pray for death.

A little less than a week later she emails to tell me her boyfriend told her she couldn’t see me so she wants to see me to make sure I’m okay. I explain that I’m not okay because she is a lying cheating whore who ruined my life and I wish all the evil in the world upon her (Yes, including that her boyfriend would actually beat her to death. It’s shocking I know but I liked her less now than before and was still hurt so I said mean things to her. I’m literally Hitler and Satan’s bastard child right?) and want nothing to do with her. She claims nothing that happened was her fault, he made her say I raped her, and the beatings have gotten worse. I din’t respond.

 

 

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Racquel Writes! 5 Lessons I Learned from my Divorce

via 5 Lessons I Learned from my Divorce

 

http://www.racquelwrites.com

 

 

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Kaja – Out of the Blue – Part 3

Pennsylvania’s DUI law prohibits driving or being in actual physical control of a vehicle while:
•having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08% or more
•having any amount of a Schedule I or II controlled substance in the body, or
•impaired by drugs or alcohol to an extent that it affects the person’s ability to operate a vehicle safely.

Generally, a driver is deemed to have violated the law if a chemical test conducted within two hours of driving shows a BAC that’s above the legal limit. (Get an estimate of how many drinks it takes to put you at .08%.)

The consequences of a DUI conviction depend on the circumstances, including whether the motorist has prior DUI convictions. This article covers second-offense penalties. (Read more about Pennsylvania’s DUI laws, including first-offense and third-offense consequences.)

(75 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 3802 (2017).)

What Is Considered a “Second-Offense” DUI

In Pennsylvania, a DUI is considered a “second offense” if the motorist has one prior DUI conviction that occurred within the past ten years—including most out-of-state DUI convictions.

(75 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 3806 (2017).)

Penalties for a Second DUI

The consequences of a second DUI conviction—which can be the result of a plea bargain or being found guilty after a trial—differ depending on the facts of the case. But generally, the possible penalties include:
•DUI based on impairment or a BAC of at least .08% but less than .1%. A second DUI conviction where the driver was convicted based on impairment or having a BAC of .08% or more but less than .1% is a misdemeanor. A convicted driver is looking at $300 to $2,500 in fines, five days to six months in jail, and a 12-month license suspension. The motorist will also have to complete an alcohol safety class and may be required to participate in substance abuse treatment.
•Impairment DUIs involving injuries, death, or property damage and DUIs involving BAC of at least .1% but less than .16%. A second DUI conviction where the driver was convicted based on impairment and someone was injured or killed or another’s property was damaged or the driver had a BAC of .1% or more but less than .16% is a misdemeanor. The convicted driver is looking at 30 days to six months in jail, $750 to $5,000 in fines, and a 12-month license suspension. The motorist will also have to complete an alcohol safety class and may be required to participate in substance abuse treatment. (Also, read about Pennsylvania’s homicide-by-vehicle laws.)
•Impairment DUIs involving a refusal to take a breath test and DUIs involving BAC of at least .16% or controlled substances. A second DUI conviction where the driver was convicted based on impairment and refused to take a breath test or the driver had a BAC of at least .16% or any concentration of a controlled substance is a first-degree misdemeanor. The convicted driver is looking at 90 days to five years in jail, at least $1,500 in fines, and an 18-month license suspension. The motorist will also have to complete an alcohol safety class and may be required to participate in substance abuse treatment.
DUIs with a minor passenger. A second offender who’s caught driving under the influence with a passenger who is under 18 years old is guilty of a first-degree misdemeanor. In addition to the penalties mentioned above, the convicted motorist is looking at least $2,500 in fines and one to six months in jail. The driver also faces an 18-month license suspension.

So they basically threw the book at Kaja to teach her a serious lesson.

Starting August 25, 2017, anyone convicted of a second DUI must have an ignition interlock device (IID) installed to obtain a restricted license during the suspension period.

(18 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 1104 (2017); 75 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 3802, 3803, 3804, 3805 (2017); Commonwealth v. Giron, 155 A.3d 635, 638 (2017).)

 

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