Celebrity Sightings: Farrah Fawcett – 1947 to 2009 – Life Uncovered – Part 1

Farrah Fawcett was the first female actress/model/celebrity I ever fell in love with. Later in life as Farrah aged, I was horribly unfaithful to my idol with super model Alessandra Ambrosio.

But Farrah with always be, First, Last and Always.

I loved Farrah so much I decided to write a little series in her honor. I hope you enjoy it.

Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts came up with the idea for a series about three beautiful female private investigators as a breakthrough but also escapist television series. Producers Aaron Spelling and Leonard Goldberg first considered actress Kate Jackson during the early pre-production stages of the series. She had proven popular with viewers in another police television drama, The Rookies. Jackson was initially cast as Kelly Garrett, but was more attracted to the role of Sabrina Duncan, and her request to switch roles was granted. Farrah Fawcett was next cast as Jill Munroe, but much like Jackson, did not audition for a role. She was offered a part by Spelling after he had viewed her performance in the science-fiction film Logan’s Run (1976). Jaclyn Smith was among the hundreds of actresses who auditioned for the role of Kelly Garrett. Despite liking Smith, Spelling and Goldberg were wary about hiring her because their initial concept concerned a brunette, blonde, and red-headed woman. Smith was the only brunette that auditioned for the role and was cast only after producers liked the on-screen chemistry she shared with Jackson and Fawcett.

In 1976 I was 13 years old. Yea…puberty explosion! Charlie’s Angels comes on and of course I start watching it. I think it was the 2nd episode, it was called, Angels in Chains. That title stuck with me. The premise of that episode was that the Angels would have to go undercover and pose as inmates at a prison. I remember two scenes in particular. The first one was where all three girls are standing wrapped only in skimpy towels. The other being them trying to escape chained together. What I found most remarkable about Farrah was that it appeared she had nipples the size of pretzel bites and never wore a bra. So you had these three hot girls running around and wearing hot outfits and braless breasts were pouting and jiggling.

Who cares what the show is about. I’m 13 years old. All I want to do is watch the show by myself in a locked room, with a large box of tissues.

The show became known as “Jiggle TV” and “T&A TV” (or “Tits & Ass Television”) by critics who believed that the show had no intelligence or substance. These characterizations stemmed from the fact that the lead actresses frequently dressed scantily or provocatively as part of their undercover characters (including roller derby girl, beauty pageant contestant, maid, female prisoner, or just bikini-clad), and the belief that their clothing was a means of attracting viewers. Farrah Fawcett once attributed the show’s success to this fact: “When the show was number three, I figured it was our acting. When it got to be number one, I decided it could only be because none of us wears a bra.”

Reflecting on the 1970’s female-driven drama, Cheryl Ladd believes the series was “inspirational” to women despite the critics calling it a “jiggle show.” She notes, “there hadn’t been a show like this on the air [with] three powerful women who had the latest hairdos, wore the coolest clothes and could walk around in a bikini. We were very inspirational to a lot of young women. Young women would write us and say, ‘I want to be like you. I want to be a cop when I grow up and taking chances to be something else other than the acceptable school teacher or secretary’. Charlie’s Angels was called “Jiggle TV”, she adds, “which made me laugh, I never went braless, and I was married and the mother of a 2-year-old. The ‘Angels’ were grown-up Girl Scouts. We never slept with anyone; my most “Aaron Spelling” moment was wrestling an alligator. With the feminist movement, we were kind of half-heroes, half-goats”.

Time magazine called Charlie’s Angels an “aesthetically ridiculous, commercially brilliant brainstorm surfing blithely atop the Zeitgeist’s seventh wave”.

Camille Paglia, an American academic and social critic, said that Charlie’s Angels was an “effervescent action-adventure showing smart, bold women working side by side in fruitful collaboration.”

So there’s two sides of what Charlie’s Angels was. I loved it. If I had the opportunity I would have watched it with the volume at zero and my stereo cranking Aerosmith. I’d ejaculate twice as fast!

I joined Farrah’s Official Fan Club. And over the years I collected posters and pictures of her. I dug out this old photo of me from back in 1982 in my apartment in L.A. That whole wall is Farrah. I even had buttons pinned to my guitar strap that were pictures of Farrah! Fanboy or a shrine to my queen? You be the judge!

(Now that I look at this pic, it may be the very first “Selfie” I have ever taken!)

With an old Kodak instamatic flash camera!

I think my parents were just happy I didn’t turn out gay. (Which they thought I was for years!)

 

 

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